El Dorado City Manager David Dillner explained how the tornado sirens in El Dorado work at Monday’s City Commission meeting.

El Dorado City Manager David Dillner explained how the tornado sirens in El Dorado work at Monday’s City Commission meeting.

A successful test of city-owned tornado sirens was administered Monday at noon. The sirens are tested the first Monday of every month at noon.

The city-owned tornado sirens were all operational. Two state-owned tornado at El Dorado Lake were not working properly.

Dillner explained that the El Dorado sirens do not have an all clear siren. When there is a imminent threat the sirens will alarm for three minutes, then rest for five minutes before alarming again for three minutes. If the sirens are silent for more than five minutes, the threat is gone.

The sirens are intended for people that are outside to take cover. They are not made to warn people that are already inside. If you are in a home or building tune to a weather radio, television or cell phone for weather updates.

The City of El Dorado dispatched crews and equipment to Eureka to help in the cleanup from the June 28 tornado. Assisting were the El Dorado Police Deparment, the El Dorado Fire Department and Public Works. Public Works sent over a street sweeper as well.

Butler County also assisted in the initial response and clean up effort. Assisting from Butler County was the Butler County Sheriff’s Department, Butler County Emergency Management and Public Works.

There was tornadic activity outside of El Dorado June 28.