Butler County Times Gazette
  • Election 2014: Pompeo talks about issues

  • Rep. Pompeo stopped in El Dorado Monday morning
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  • Rep. Mike Pompeo, who is running for re-election to the 4th District House seat, stopped in El Dorado Monday morning to talk with constituents at Scooters Coffeehouse.
    Pompeo answered several questions from those attending.
    One was about the importance of trust in campaigning.
    "I'm for it," he said. "We've really tried."
    He said they have done a lot of fact checking. The media also fact checks their spots and said his were found truthful, while his opponent's, Todd Tiahrt, were often half-truths.
    "It's about you guys," Pompeo said. "Who wants to feel like you're being tricked. We owe you the truth."
    He also was asked about Benghazi.
    Pompeo is serving on the committee overseeing that.
    "There is not a lot of progress yet," he said. "It is hart putting a whole new staff in place."
    He said they have had multiple depositions.
    "Our intent is not to hold a lot of hearings," he said. "Our intention is to get the facts."
    He said they hope by early spring they have the documents they need and some answers and have a report by late spring.
    "We shouldn't have had four people killed," Pompeo said.
    To help prevent that in the future, the committee will make process and policy recommendations.
    He also was asked if he would vote for House Speaker John Boehner.
    "I have made it my policy to vote for the most conservative person I think can win," he said. "With respect to John Boehner, it's a tough deal to have 90 Republicans who think about America differently than Kansas. It is very difficult to get what is a broad Republican party together on issues."
    He said it was possible the current speaker wouldn't run again.
    "I always think new is good too," he said.
    Pompeo also hopes the Senate is on their side after November, explaining the House has passed 342 bills that are setting on Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's desk.
    "They ought to at least consider them," he said. "It's been frustrating."
    He also said they know the president is not going to sign a lot of their bills either.
    Next, Pompeo was asked about losing records.
    He said what he has heard is now they say they have found some of the IRS hard drives and they have employees in the IRS who are trying to make things right.
    Following up with that, he was asked if the IRS moves with the politics.
    He said it has been doing that, but it has to be neutral. He said the IRS needed to do their job and politicians do theirs.
    Page 2 of 2 - He went on to talk about environmental regulations.
    He said one proposed law would cost between $800 billion and $1.2 trillion and would get rid of 1.8 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. He went on to say they could not even tell how that would affect things or if it would have an impact.
    He said people have to ask who is involved in making these rules. The people doing it saw the president' chief of staff 43 times and made 117 visits to another political figure.
    "You realize this is not about science and health and clean air," Pompeo said.
    He said, while the EPA has some rules they should enforce, they should not set policy.
    He also was asked about campaign spending.
    He said he recently read an article about third party spending and that is increasing rapidly.
    "The Supreme Court ruled you can't put limits on spending," he said. "I think the best solution is some sort of disclosure.
    "I think it is inevitable when there is this much power in Washington, people come to compete to get business. You have to take the power out of Washington."
    He said everyone was moving their headquarters to D.C. because that is where the resources are located.
    He said he had no ill will to those who come to advocate, but he would rather have it sorted out locally.
    "Today the money is all in Washington," he said.
    He said they shrunk the EPA by 20 percent but no one even noticed.
    "The problem with government spending is not a Barack Obama problem," he said. "I am as critical of him as any but the problem with the federal government growing is an American problem. Congressmen love to say yes. You don't want to tell your constituents you can't help. Someone has to say you can't do it that way."
    Julie Clements can be reached at jclements@butlercountytimesgazette.com.

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