Butler County Times Gazette
  • Global Parts debuts new technology

  • In addition to expanding current operations, Global Parts owner Troy Palmer took a chance and started a new kind of work.
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  • Global Parts enjoyed success even before they became one of the biggest employers in the Augusta Industrial Park.
    But now, in addition to expanding current operations, owner Troy Palmer took a chance and started a new kind of work.
    With the addition of Production Manager Chris Roberts about six months ago and an investment in millions of dollars in machine tools and software to run them, Global Parts has almost immediately become a major player in the milling and manufacturing industry.
    “We wanted to be different,” Roberts said. “Troy made the investment to make Global Part a top notch niche shop.”
    Roberts said the company has the equipment to compete head to head with smaller shops on smaller orders. But with the two new machines recently put in place and two more on the way, the company will be able to do work that other shops can only dream about.
    With Makino and Haas machines and software capable of running 3, 4 or 5 axis milling jobs, the company can work in soft metals like aluminum, copper and steel. But Global Parts also invested in machines that can mill stainless steel and titanium parts to extremely tight tolences.
    “Everybody cuts aluminum,” Roberts said. “We didn’t want to compete by underbidding other people. We wanted to compete on jobs others can’t do.”
    The company is already doing work for companies that have contracts with Boeing and soon they will compete for jobs directly with Boeing and Spirit.
    But the aerospace industry is just the start for Global Parts.
    “We can do anything,” Roberts said. “We even have some motorcycle parts in the shop now. We like the big contracts and the fun smaller projects.”
    The technology behind the machines – that can mill parts as large as 73 inches – is so precise that if a machine encounters problems, it will send a message to Roberts’ cell phone and he can respond 24 hour a day.
    “These machines will probably fill up quickly,” Roberts said. “I expect them to be running 24 hours a day before long.”
    The company is currently being certified by auditors and at that point, they will be able to bid on any job.
    “Everything has happened all at once,” Roberts said. “We are so busy right now. And we are already making plans to expand. I can’t wait until jobs are going out of here every day.”
    Palmer recently told the city council that up to 20 jobs could be added over the next few years if the company continues to expand at the current rate.
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