Democratic Secretary of State Chris Biggs took a jab Thursday at his Republican opponent, signing a pledge to work full-time in his government job if Kansas voters elect him in November.


 Democratic Secretary of State Chris Biggs took a jab Thursday at his Republican opponent, signing a pledge to work full-time in his government job if Kansas voters elect him in November.

Biggs said he is trying to make a point about Republican nominee Kris Kobach's work on immigration issues, which Kobach says he would keep doing as secretary of state, and his intent to expand the scope of the office.

"This office may not be as glamorous as what Kris Kobach might prefer, but it performs important public services that require a proven public servant, not a politician," Biggs said.

Kobach, a Kansas City-area law professor and former Kansas GOP chairman, has built a reputation for advising city officials and legislators in other states about cracking down on illegal immigration.

He helped write the new Arizona law that empowers police to question anyone they suspect of being in the country illegally. He has also helped city officials in Fremont, Neb., with an immigration ordinance and has offered to defend it in court for free.

Kobach said his first priority would be Kansas residents and he will work "40 to 50 hours at least" as a full-time secretary of state. He said he planned to still handle some immigration work across the country but most of it could be done at night or on weekends.