A Kansas doctor whose clinic is linked by authorities to 68 overdose deaths had a reputation in the medical community as the "candy man" for his prescribing habits, an emergency room doctor testified Thursday.


 

A Kansas doctor whose clinic is linked by authorities to 68 overdose deaths had a reputation in the medical community as the "candy man" for his prescribing habits, an emergency room doctor testified Thursday.

Dr. Brent Rody, chief medical officer for Via Christi Hospital in Wichita, testified during the trial of Dr. Stephen Schneider and his wife, Linda. Both are charged with writing unlawful prescriptions leading to death, fraud and money laundering at their clinic in Haysville. If convicted, they could face up to life in prison.

Rody told jurors that Schneider Medical Clinic patients often came into the emergency room asking for more narcotic medications, suffering withdrawal symptoms or overdosing on drugs.

He said he called Schneider several times to tell him to stop sending his patients to the emergency room. Rody also said he told Schneider that he thought the number of medications the doctor was prescribing was "crazy."

"I told him very specifically he was giving them too many medications," Rody said.

On cross examination, Rody acknowledged that the Schneider clinic was open seven days a week and it was possible that some of his emergency room patients were looking for narcotics because the clinic had refused to give them more.