There are no more breaks when it comes to high school athletics and the reason, according to Augusta High strength and conditioning coach Matt Ingrim, is pretty simple.


 


There are no more breaks when it comes to high school athletics and the reason, according to Augusta High strength and conditioning coach Matt Ingrim, is pretty simple.


It’s been a month since any high school or middle school athletics and next year’s activities don’t start until after Labor Day, but Ingrim has been responsible for activity around the Augusta High School weight room during June as those who plan on participating for the Orioles or the Bluejays don’t want to be left behind.


“The biggest issue is that we do train athletes to complete year round in a variety of sports,” Ingrim said. “Athletics has become a year around thing. If you want to become a serious, competitive athlete, I don’t care what the sport, you need to be training all year around, mostly because your opponents are.


“A great majority of our student-athletes here have bought into our program; and our buy-in from our head coaches has been extraordinary. A vast majority of our head coaches are behind what we do here.”


Strength and conditioning doesn’t mean just hitting the weight room and it’s not just for football players. A program also involves running, stretching and other workouts to help not only the cardio-vascular system, but also the student athlete’s body as a whole.


“We try to really train the entire athlete,” Ingrim said. “We want to have something here that a multi-sport athlete can use in regards to flexibility, agility and sprint endurance. Weights are a key component of it, but it’s not all-inclusive.


“Weight training is not body building. It’s not about getting all ‘beefed up’ and muscle bound. It’s about trying to maximize your potential as a student athlete. Whether that means you’re one of our football players or one of our female athletes or even a non-athlete; we have things here that will help maximize your potential.”


Ingrim also understands it’s not necessarily the weight that helps a person. One of the high school athletes during a recent workout didn’t use proper technique as he was lifting a heavy bar. Although the athlete wasn’t hurt, Ingrim immediately went to that person and talked to him about making sure he did his weight lifting the right way.


“The change is the necessity of these explosive lifts that involve multi-joints and using different muscle groups in conjunction with each other to go through these Olympic style lifts,” Ingrim said. “ Technique is No. 1. We start with technique and safety and making sure we are keeping all of those body parts safe. We always stress technique and range of motion before be worry about heavy weights.


“That’s how you become a better athlete by training with a range of motion.”