It was a morning of insects, pets and bread making, among other things, at the 2008 Butler County 4-H Mini Fair Saturday morning.

The mini fair is held once a year and offers the opportunity for 4-H members to show their projects, including those that don’t have a category at the regular fair.


It was a morning of insects, pets and bread making, among other things, at the 2008 Butler County 4-H Mini Fair Saturday morning.

The mini fair is held once a year and offers the opportunity for 4-H members to show their projects, including those that don’t have a category at the regular fair.

Several members set up booths, ranging from growing vegetables to their favorite books and there also were a lot of hands-on activities in which the kids could take part.

Shannon Baker was enjoying everything about the fair.

She had reading and photography exhibits in the fair and also brought her cat, Little Guy, to show.

Jason Johnson was trying his hand at making bread.

“I’m having fun,” he declared.

His favorite part was the insects.

Another exhibit was on origami, which was being shown by Lois Johnson.

“I guess it goes with arts and crafts,” she said.

She was giving demonstrations on how to make origami.

She got interested in it from a host student they had from Japan a couple of years ago.

“She taught me all sorts of origami,” she said. “It’s interesting and kind of educational.”

One of her favorites is a duck.

Their former host student also sent her some new origami paper for Lois’s birthday, which she was enjoying trying out.

While she usually follows patterns, when she can’t find one she said she will experiment and make it up on her own.

Lois also was enjoying the fair.

“I just like going around looking at the displays,” she said, adding that she liked the entomology, although her favorite part was the pancake eating contest, in which she was participating.

Jacob Lewellen had a display set up called “Jacob’s Chickens.”

“I got chickens from by grandpa,” he explained. “They’re Road Island Reds.”

His exhibit showed the different types of food to feed the chickens, such as laying hen pellets that are given as the main food. He also had scratch grain and oyster shells that are used as feed.

“When a chicken is born, it lives off of the left-over yolk,” he said. “It takes about 26 hours to lay an egg.”

Jacob said there were more chickens than people in the world.

Lindsey Lewellen also had a display of her family garden.

“We had a few vegetables that we already picked,” she said, showing part of her display.

Those were grown from plants that were already started, but she also showed how to start a garden from seeds.

“First you have to plant the seeds, then take care of them, then pick them,” she said.

She likes having a garden because then they don’t have to go to the store and buy all of the food.

“You can go to the garden and see what is ready and pick the food,” Lindsey said.

Prizes were given away during the fair for the pancake eating contest, as well as a water balloon toss.